Author Archives: waynea

Book Discussion Group (Jan. 2020)

Enjoy pupus by the water and engage in dynamic conversation about New York Times bestseller A Woman of No Importance: The Untold Story of the American Spy Who Helped Win World War II by Sonia Purnell! (Please note that the author will not be at the event.)

In 1942, the Gestapo sent out an urgent transmission: “She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find and destroy her.”

The target in their sights was Virginia Hall, a Baltimore socialite who talked her way into Special Operations Executive, the spy organization dubbed Winston Churchill’s “Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare.” She became the first Allied woman deployed behind enemy lines and–despite her prosthetic leg–helped to light the flame of the French Resistance, revolutionizing secret warfare as we know it.

Virginia established vast spy networks throughout France, called weapons and explosives down from the skies, and became a linchpin for the Resistance. Even as her face covered wanted posters and a bounty was placed on her head, Virginia refused order after order to evacuate. She finally escaped through a death-defying hike over the Pyrenees into Spain, her cover blown. But she plunged back in, adamant that she had more lives to save, and led a victorious guerilla campaign, liberating swathes of France from the Nazis after D-Day.

Based on new and extensive research, Sonia Purnell has for the first time uncovered the full secret life of Virginia Hall–an astounding and inspiring story of heroism, spy craft, resistance, and personal triumph over shocking adversity. A Woman of No Importance is the breathtaking story of how one woman’s fierce persistence helped win the war.

WHEN: Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2019, 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm

WHERE: Waikiki Yacht Club (1599 Ala Moana Blvd, Honolulu, HI 96814), ask for Mary Ann Eichorn when checking in

Pupus hosted by AAUW Honolulu
No host cocktails (bring cash for drink purchases)

Talk Story Tuesdays (Jan. 2020)

Give yourself a treat! Meet, mingle and enjoy complimentary pupus and beverages at happy hour prices. At Talk Story Tuesdays we engage in great conversations on the topics of today that impact women and girls in Hawaii.

We will discuss:

  • Women and political leadership
  • What’s in Women’s Legislative Caucus package to kickoff the 2020 legislative session
  • Hawaii’s Title IX bill, the first state law to include protection of LGBTQ+ students, which becomes law on Jan. 1, 2020

State Senators Rosalyn Baker, Michelle Kidani, Laura Thielen and former state Senator Jill Tokuda will be our guests at this event.

Psst…spread the word and invite your friends and family!

All ages welcome!

We’re also working with Partners in Care to collect menstrual products that will be distributed during their Point in Time Count in January 2020. We will be collecting pads and tampons. Preferred donations are Ziplock bags with 10 pieces in each bag. Each bag has just tampons or just pads, not both. But Partners in Care will also accept packages of tampons and pads that have not been sorted.

Please contact us if you have any mobility issues or will require special accommodations to participate. Parking and/or other accommodations can typically be provided upon request.

WHEN: Jan. 14, 2020 ~ 5:30-7:30pm
WHERE: The Plaza Club, Pioneer Plaza, 900 Fort St Mall, 20th Floor, Honolulu, HI 96813 — in The Board Room

Parking for Plaza Club $3.75 in Pioneer Plaza after 5PM; entrance for parking at Pioneer Plaza is on Merchant Street. Nearby municipal lots, $3. Street parking may be available.

Naʻau Walaʻau: Being an indigenous Woman in Higher Education

AAUW-UH-Manoa will host “Naʻau Walaʻau: Being an indigenous Woman in Higher Education” as part of its Indigenous Women’s Empowerment Talk series on Nov. 5, 5 pm to 7 pm at UH-Manoa QLC 412.

The talk will feature indigenous women sharing their experiences in higher education and how they balance identity with their positions.

WHEN: Tuesday, Nov. 5,, 2019, 5 pm to 7 pm

WHERE: UH-Manoa QLC 412

HIFF Showing of Reel Wāhine of Hawai‘i Season 2, Lunch Discussion

Want to attend a screening with an extensive discussion with its director? Scroll down to find out how you can attend The Perfect Candidate!

Reel Wāhine of Hawai‘i Season 2, a documentary filmed by women filmmakers about women in the local independent film scene, will be featured as part of the Hawaii International Film Festival on Saturday, Nov. 16 at the Regal Dole Cannery 1 at noon to 1:35 pm.

Please note that you must purchase your tickets for the Saturday, Nov. 16 showing through HIFF here.

AAUW Honolulu invites its members to support this documentary. We’ll be meeting at Tiny Pyramid at 560 N. Nimitz Hwy. after the showing at 2 pm to discuss the movie. A light, family-style lunch will be provided; drinks and desserts (they’re delicious!) can be purchased by the attendees.

Vera Zambonelli, the film’s co-producer and executive director of Hawaii Women in Filmmaking, and Shirley Thompson, co-producer and the film’s director will be our guest at the lunch.

Click here to RSVP for lunch!

Zambonelli is also offering 15 tickets to AAUW Honolulu members for The Perfect Candidate, directed by Haifaa Al-Mansour, this year’s HIFF feature spotlight filmmaker. Al-Mansour broke ground with her debut film, Wadjda, the first film shot entirely in Saudi Arabia — and the first made by a Saudi woman. The screening is an extended “master class” discussion with Al-Mansour. Use the code MAHALO39 to claim your ticket — but act fast, there’s only 15 available! The film begins at 3 p.m. on Nov. 16, following the lunch.

WHEN: Nov. 16, 2019 ~ Noon to 1:35 pm for the showing of Reel Wāhine of Hawai‘i 2; light lunch at Tiny Pyramid to follow at 2 p.m.

WHERE: Regal Dole Cannery Stadium 18 & IMAX, 735 Iwilei Rd,
Honolulu; Tiny Pyramid, 560 N. Nimitz Hwy., Honolulu (Na Lama Kukui Center, formerly the Old Pacific Gentry Center).

Honolulu Star-Advertiser: Professional development will enable women to ascend, Oct. 20, 2019

AAUW Honolulu Career and Leadership Development Grant recipient Sara Ward penned this op-ed about the importance of professional development for women.

Read it here or if you aren’t a subscriber to the Honolulu Star-Advertiser, read it below.


Column: Professional development will enable women to ascend
By Sara Ward

Oct. 20, 2019

It’s been a very long time since women were a novelty in the workplace — but why does equality still elude our workplaces?

Nationally, women make 20% less than men do on average. In your place of work, chances are the women make 82 cents on the dollar that a man, who’s doing the same job and with the same experience, makes on the average. That number is from AAUW’s most recent research into the issue, “The Simple Truth about the Gender Pay Gap” (from 2018’s U.S. Census Bureau numbers). That pay disparity increases for women who are minorities.

In Hawaii, AAUW’s research on gender wage-gap numbers, also from the Census, found that the state was above that average in 2015 with 84 cents to every dollar a man made on average. But in 2017, women made just 81 cents to every dollar a man made; in 2018, it was 83 cents.

In a state where the cost of living is unbearably high to begin with, any kind of pay disparity — especially one tied to gender — is too much.

It’s been estimated that at the current rate of progress, the gender wage gap will close in 2105. That’s not a typo. But even if the gender wage gap was eliminated, women in the workplace face even more hurdles.

Women also face the challenge of advancement in their careers. Nationally, less than 29% are executives, according to AAUW’s 2016 study, “Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership.” The numbers are even worse for women of color, comprising less than 4% of executives and managers.

This is why just addressing the gender wage gap isn’t enough. Women need to take the issues of wage equity and representation in upper management as intertwined and symbiotic.

Hawaii’s made progress in addressing the wage gap through recently passed laws that allow employees to talk about how much they make without fear of retaliation or ask for salary history.

But C-level executives shouldn’t just pat their backs and call it a day. They must examine their employee pool and their management teams and take an honest look at their policies regarding pay and advancement. Even companies with corporate cultures that think of themselves as progressive have implicit bias that underpays women and holds them back from contributing fully as senior management members.

Researchers have found stereotypes associated with leadership are overwhelmingly masculine and this shapes subconscious promotion decisions that skew toward men, even if people claim to have no bias toward which gender is in charge.

Grooming the next generation of leaders is always an important responsibility of any company’s leadership. But in many cases the continuing education for additional training and certification overlooks women. The opportunity to attend important networking events like conferences and conventions, which help build the professional relationships so important to becoming an effective corporate leader, often go to men.

I am lucky to work in theater production. I’ve worked as a volunteer, a child actor wrangler, line prompter, set changer, props designer, box office manager, officer manager and now assistant executive director.

It’s a profession I feel passionate about. However, I’m even luckier to have worked for people, and to continue to work for people, who recognize the contributions I bring to my job and nurture my potential with management responsibilities.

The faith and opportunities my superiors have shown me and given me in my career are true blessings. However, I do realize that many women, who are deserving of being managers or executives, are often overlooked.

Companies across Hawaii should ask themselves if they are doing enough to give the women in their organizations the opportunity to reach their full professional potential.

Meet AAUW Honolulu’s Student Interns!

Did you know AAUW Honolulu sponsors student interns at the University of Hawaii? They come from diverse backgrounds and bring their personal experiences with them.

AAUW Honolulu’s interns promote the group’s activities, plan new events on the UH-Manoa campus, perform outreach to students regarding scholarships and assist other UH campuses interested in AAUW’s activities. This year two students are splitting the 20 hours per week as AAUW Honolulu interns.

The University of Hawaii’s Office of Civic and Community Engagement has also hired a junior intern to assist, with the hope she will continue the ongoing work of the program, after the current interns graduate.

Bernadette Rose Mahiehie Kanoelani Garrett, intern
Aloha, O Bernadette Rose Mahiehie Kanoelani Garrett koʻu inoa. No Waimānalo, Oʻahu mai au. I am a Political Science major with an interest in Peace Studies (PACE). I am a proud Kanaka Māoli and believe in the empowerment of all including indigenous and aboriginal women.

 

 

 

Autumn-Raine Hesia, intern
Aloha nō! ʻO Autumn-Raine Hesia koʻu inoa. I am originally from the island of Maui, but moved to Las Vegas, Nevada at the age of 8 and lived there for 10 years. I am a recent graduate of Windward Community College with my Associates Degree in Liberal Arts and Hawaiian Studies, with a certificate in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi. I am currently a Junior majoring in Ethnic Studies while pursuing a Masters in Education Administration. I am a lover of all things travel, culture, food, and learning about different cultures around the world. I have a passion for perpetuating my Hawaiian culture through hula, activism, and education alongside representing my Puerto Rican ethnicity with pride.

Ronja Steinbach, junior intern
Greetings! My name is Ronja Steinbach and I am currently a freshman at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. I was born and raised in a bicultural household in New Mexico, after my parents moved to the United States from Germany. Even though I was landlocked for most of my life, I always dreamed of studying marine biology, something that I am very excited to pursue here in Hawaii. I look forward not only to being surrounded by the incredible and beautiful resource that is the ocean, but also by the different cultures and people that live here. Fostering a proactive and healthy community has been one of my greatest goals and has shaped many of the decisions I have made, including my desire to be a scientist. It has also been the reason for my social activism, especially throughout my time in high school, because in the end, we are all connected by our humanity and the planet that we call home.

Students interested in applying go through an application process through UH-Manoa’s Student Employment Program. All applicants are reviewed by Atina Pascua, Director of the Office of Civic and Community Engagement.

 

Talk Story Tuesdays (November 2019)

Give yourself a treat! Meet, mingle and enjoy complimentary pupus and beverages at happy hour prices. At Talk Story Tuesdays we engage in great conversations on the topics of today that impact women and girls in Hawaii.

We’ll be talking story about LGBTQ+ issues and how they affect the community in Hawaii.

Our confirmed speakers will be:

  • Cathy Kapua, Transgender Health Manager at Hawai‘i Health and Harm Reduction Center
  • Keiva Lei K. Cadena, Community Engagement Coordinator at Hawai‘i Health and Harm Reduction Center
  • Trey Halliday Fenton, Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Certified Substance Abuse Counselor specializing working with individuals on the LGBTQ spectrum

We’re also working with Partners in Care to collect menstrual products that will be distributed during their Point in Time Count in January 2020. We will be collecting pads and tampons. Preferred donations are Ziplock bags with 10 pieces in each bag. Each bag has just tampons or just pads, not both. But Partners in Care will also accept packages of tampons and pads that have not been sorted.

Psst…spread the word and invite your friends and family!

All ages welcome!

Please contact us if you have any mobility issues or will require special accommodations to participate. Parking and/or other accommodations can typically be provided upon request.

WHEN: Nov. 12, 2019 ~ 5:30-7:30pm
WHERE: The Plaza Club, Pioneer Plaza, 900 Fort St Mall, 20th Floor, Honolulu, HI 96813 — in The Board Room

Parking for Plaza Club $3.75 in Pioneer Plaza after 5PM; entrance for parking at Pioneer Plaza is on Merchant Street. Nearby municipal lots, $3. Street parking may be available.